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ROYAL NAVY MEDALS - AWARDS of the MILITARY CROSS (MC)

from the London Gazette in edition order


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British Army award for junior officers, equivalent to Royal Navy's Distinguished Service Cross. The illustration is a WW1 award - the middle stripe is purple.

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or  to World War 1, 1914-1918

 
 

 Includes Royal Marines

 

 

1915

 

all War Office, and included in Army lists

 

 

29286 - 3 SEPTEMBER 1915

..... confer the Military Cross on the undermentioned Officer(s), in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field: 

Temporary Lieutenant Franks Lubbock Robinson, Royal Marine Artillery. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as Artillery Observing Officer between 30th July and 10th August, 1915, when posted on a high building in the neighbourhood of Ypres. The building was continually shelled by the enemy with heavy guns, but he maintained his position, a most precarious and dangerous one, even when the building was in imminent danger of falling, and supplied valuable information throughout.

 

 

 

1916

 

all War Office, and included in Army lists

 

 

29824 - 14 NOVEMBER 1916

 

..... confer the Military Cross on the undermentioned Officers and. Warrant Officers in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field:

Temp. 2nd Lt. Harry Noel Keyes Elphick, R.M.A. For conspicuous gallantry. With another officer he laid wires across the open under heavy shell fire in close proximity to the enemy. On one occasion he was cut off for nine hours, and under very heavy shell fire.

 

Lt. John Franklyn, R.M.A. For conspicuous gallantry during operations. He is always ready for any dangerous work, and has successfully carried out several hazardous reconnaissances in search of O.P's. On one occasion he was cut off for nine hours and under heavy shell fire. (sic - partly a repeat of above text)

 


 

 

29886 - 29 DECEMBER 1916

 

..... for distinguished service in the field, dated 1st January, 1917:

 

Awarded the Military Cross.

Temp. Lt. Alan Urquhart Campbell, R.N. Divn., attd. T.M. By.

Temp. Sub-Lt. William Charles Haken, R.N. Divn.

Temp. Lt. Basil Courtenay Victor Weeks, R.M.

 

 

 

1917

 

all War Office, and included in Army lists

 

 

29898 10 JANUARY 1917

 

..... confer the Military Cross on the undermentioned Officers and Warrant Officers in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field:

Temp. Sub-Lt. William Arblaster, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He carried out three most valuable reconnaissances under heavy fire, and obtained information of vital importance.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. William Carnall, D.S.M., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He led out a battle patrol into the presence of the enemy, chose a position within a few yards of them, and thus made secure the right flank. He set a splendid example of coolness and courage throughout the operations.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Albert Edward Dossett, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. Although severely wounded, he continued to lead and encourage his men, displaying great courage and determination.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Geoffrey Dunn, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He displayed great courage and initiative in extinguishing a fire in an ammunition dump, thereby undoubtedly saving many lives.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Ernest Victor George Gardner, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He showed great courage and initiative in keeping his men together and continuing the attack at a critical time. He personally carried out several valuable reconnaissances under heavy fire.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Frederick Charles Hill, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He collected ammunition from casualties under heavy fire, which was of the utmost importance. Later, he chose positions for eighteen guns and guided the teams, thus making a thinly-held line secure.

 

Temp. Surg. Frank Pearce Pocock, R.N., attd. R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He  displayed great courage and determination in dressing the wounded and leading stretcher parties. He worked continuously for three days under heavy fire.

 


 

 

29921 26 JANUARY 1917

 

..... confer the Military Cross on the undermentioned Officers and Warrant Officers, in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field:

Temp. Sub-Lt. Daniel Marcus William Beak, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He led his men in the attack with great courage and initiative and materially assisted in the capture of the enemy line. He set a fine example throughout.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Boyden Frank Bowerman, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He rallied considerable numbers of men and led them forward under heavy fire. He set a splendid example of courage and coolness throughout.

 

Temp. Lt. Bernard Dangerfield, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He established and maintained communication under, very heavy fire. Later, he carried out a dangerous reconnaissance and led a considerable number of men forward who were held up.

 

Temp. Lt. Edward Vezian Ellis, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He led a counter bombing attack down the enemy second line trench, which had been only partially occupied by our troops, and was instrumental in capturing a number of prisoners.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Frank Oliver Forrester, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He led a party of twenty men into an enemy trench with great gallantry and captured 129 prisoners. He set a fine example of courage and coolness.

 

Rev. Percy Hallding, R.N., A. Chaplns. Dept. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He displayed great courage and determination in attending to the wounded under heavy fire. On one occasion he carried a wounded officer from the open into safety.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Walter Kilroy Harris, R.N.V.R For conspicuous gallantry in action. He led a raid against an enemy machine gun with great gallantry, capturing the gun and turning it on the enemy. Later, he led a small bombing party and was instrumental in capturing 102 prisoners.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Albert Paul Mecklenburg, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. Although twice wounded, he rallied his men close in front of a strongly held enemy position, and, charging right through, broke up all opposition and reached his correct objective.

 

Temp. Lt. John Frederick Alexander Pitcairn, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He led a bombing attack with great courage and determination. Later, he held a blocking point against repeated enemy attacks.

 

Temp. Surg. George Lee Ritchie, M.B., R.N., attd. R.N.D. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He displayed great courage and determination in collecting and attending to the wounded under very heavy fire.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Percy Reginald Wait, R.N.V.R., attd. M.G. Coy. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He led carrying parties to the front line under intense fire, thereby keeping up a continual supply of ammunition and stores. Later, he rendered valuable assistance by attending to the wounded.

 


 

 

29940 13 FEBRUARY 1917

   

..... award a Bar to the Military Cross to the undermentioned Officer(s):

Temp. Lt. Alan Urquhart Campbell, M.C., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He brought his guns into action with good effect. Later, he guided two Tanks to the enemy first line system, and materially assisted in taking over 400 prisoners. (The award of the M.C. was published in the London Gazette dated 1st Jan., 1917.)

 


 

 

30001 - 23 MARCH 1917

  

..... confer the Military Cross on the undermentioned Officers and Warrant Officers, in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field:

Temp. Sub-Lt. David Ablett, R.N.V.R., attd. Trench Mortar By. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He skilfully established his trench mortar positions and assisted in capturing 31 prisoners. Later, he rallied some infantry, put a trench in a state of defence, and drove off an enemy attack.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Reginald Francis Edsall Blackmore, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He led a very gallant; attack against an enemy strong point. Later, although wounded, he maintained his position and rendered a clear report of the situation.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. John Frederick Bunce, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He carried out a dangerous reconnaissance and obtained most valuable information. He has on many occasions carried out valuable reconnaissance work.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Joseph Clark, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He held a portion of a trench with only fourteen men for two nights and a day. He repelled a strong enemy counter-attack and captured a strong point with several prisoners.

 

Temp. Sub.-Lt. William Alexander Fernie, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He organised carrying parties, led them up to the dumps under heavy fire, thereby ensuring the supply of ammunition and bombs to the front line at a critical time.

 

Temp. Sub.-Lt. Hugh Merton Graham, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He carried out a daring reconnaissance of the enemy's front line, and obtained most valuable information. 

 

Temp. Lt. James Curzon Hilton, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He handled his company in the attack with marked ability, and maintained his position against several enemy counter-attacks. He set a splendid example of courage and determination throughout. 

 

Capt. Henry Basil Inman, R.M.L.I. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He handled his company with marked ability and maintained his position under the most trying conditions. He set a splendid example to his men. 

 

Temp. Sub.-Lt. Walter Paterson Lyally R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. During an enemy counter-attack he continually visited his men under very heavy fire. His men were hard pressed, and his gallant action undoubtedly saved the posts from being rushed.

 

Temp. Sub.-Lt. Harold Alfred Pound, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He assumed command of a company, and, under the most difficult conditions, succeeded in closing a gap in the front line. He set a fine example of courage and determination.

 

Temp. Sub.-Lt. Basil Bedsmore Rackham, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He showed marked ability in preparing gun positions, and continually moved from position to position under very heavy fire. On another occasion, he displayed great bravery in going round the whole line during an enemy counter-attack.  

 

Temp. Lt. William Lister Robotti, R.M.L.I. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He conducted two echelons of a pack-animal train to within 300 yards of the front line, under very heavy fire. He displayed great courage throughout, and set a fine example to his men.

 

Temp. Sub.-Lt. John Cecil Sterndale-Bennett, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. He rushed up and endeavoured to save a post which was being strongly attacked by the enemy. In doing this he was severely wounded, but refused to leave his post until another officer could be found to replace him.

 


 

 

30023 - 17 APRIL 1917

 

..... confer the Military Cross on the undermentioned Officers and Warrant Officers in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field:

Temp. Lt. William Edmund Brian Barclay,. R.N.V.R., attd. M.G. Coy. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He captured an enemy machine gun and brought it into action, thereby materially assisting in repelling an enemy counter-attack. He set a splendid example to his men.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Philip Henchman Bolus, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He collected men from different units, reorganised them, and led them forward to the attack. Later, although severely wounded, he still continued to give orders and encourage his men.

 

Temp. Surg. Frederick Hugh Lester Cunningham, R.N. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He displayed great courage and determination in searching for the wounded in exposed positions and tending them under very heavy fire. He has previously done fine work.

 

Temp. Surg. William James McCracken, M.B., R.N. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He continually attended to the wounded under very heavy fire. He has previously done fine work.

 

Temp. Lt. (temp. Capt.) John Pearson, R. Marines. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He carried out the consolidation of the battalion's left front and materially assisted in repulsing an enemy counterattack at a critical time.

 

Temp. Lt. Edmund Augustus Sprange, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led his company most gallantly in the assault, subsequently consolidating the captured position and establishing a line of posts beyond the final objective. He has previously done fine work.

 


 

 

30111 - 1 JUNE 1917

     

..... rewards for distinguished service in the field:

 

Awarded the Military Cross.

Capt. Arthur Kelly Evans, R.M.L.I.

T./Sub-Lt. William Reginald Gibson, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub-Lt. Michael Isaacs, R.N.V.R.

T./Capt. John Scott Marshall, R.E., frmly. R. Mar.

T./Lt. Bertie Halcro Nicholson, R.N.V.R.

T./Lt. Godfrey Midgley Chassereau Taylor, R.E. (late R.M.L.I.).

 


 

 

30188 - 17 JULY 1917

  

..... award a Bar to the Military Cross to the undermentioned Officers:

Temp. Sub. Lieut. (actg. Lieut.-Comdr.) Daniel Marcus William Beak, M.C., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry during operations, when he continually dashed forward, under heavy fire, to reorganize the men, and led them on with great bravery through the enemy barrage and machine-gun fire. (Military Cross gazetted 26th January, 1917.)

 

Temp. Sub-Lieut. Walter Kilroy Harris, M.C., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry during operations. Owing to the enemy's wire being very thick the situation during an advance became critical, and heavy casualties were occurring in his company. With great bravery he kept cheering his men on, and when through the wire he organised bombing parties to protect the flanks. His conduct throughout was magnificent. (M.C. gazetted 26th January, 1917.)

_____

 

..... confer the Military Cross on the undermentioned Officers and Warrant Officers in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field:

Temp. Sub-Lt. Thomas Barrow-Dowling, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion. When, during an intense barrage, three of his guns and crews had been buried, he at once proceeded, under a heavy fire, to effect a rescue, and succeeded in recovering one gun and a few men, and later, on receiving reinforcements, he reorganised the situation and remained at his post until, in the last stage of exhaustion, he was relieved.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Winthrop James Crosland-Taylor, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion under heavy shell fire during several enemy counter-attacks. He not only tended the wounded in full view of snipers, but he led back Lewis gunners, who had been driven from their posts, and his courage and example greatly helped to save a critical situation.

 

Temp  Sub. Lt. Everard Nelson Gaskell Exton, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion in action. He led his section with great courage and skill, reaching the final line of attack with the infantry. Later he, with most of his crew, was buried by shell fire, but was rescued, and remained at his post for another 24 hours, although suffering from shock.

 

 Temp. Sub-Lt. Percy Russell Halton Fox. R.N.V.R. (now 2nd Lt., E. Kent R.). For conspicuous gallantry and determination in leading his men under very heavy fire. He carried out valuable reconnaissance work, and his coolness and personal example to all ranks with him greatly contributed to the success of the operations.

 

Temp. 2nd Lt. Ernest Allan Godfrey, R. Marines. For conspicuous gallantry and resource during operations, when he worked his guns with great skill and endurance for 60 hours without rest, and under a heavy enemy barrage, against a strong point which eventually surrendered.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Harold Grant-Dalton, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and resource. When all the officers of his company had become casualties he assumed the command, and by his bravery and personal example was able successfully to defend an exposed piece of the line. He has on previous occasions done fine work.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. John Leigh Herring, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion when leading his men in an attack, and in reorganising them under heavy fire when disorganised by uncut wire. Later, he led bombing parties with great bravery and skill until finally wounded.

 

Capt. Edward John Huskisson, R.M.L.I. For conspicuous gallantry when reconnoitring, under a heavy shell fire, a position and organising guides prior to an assault. It was mainly owing to his coolness and courage that the battalion was successfully placed in alignment in the face of the greatest difficulties.

 

Temp. Sub.-Lt. Charles Leonard Jones, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry in action. The only means of communication between different sections of his company was exposed to heavy machine gun and rifle fire. Nevertheless, he continually went up and down the line encouraging and controlling the men. His bravery was most marked. 

 

Temp. Lt. James Gilmore Mackinlay, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and ability when surviving company commander during a heavy and at first partially successful enemy counter-attack. His bravery and skilful disposition not only re-established the position, but largely contributed to the repulse of the enemy with heavy loss.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Lawrence Charles Matcham, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion. He led his company with great bravery and skill, capturing several enemy positions, and later rendered invaluable assistance in organising their defence under a very heavy fire. 

 

Temp. Lt. Frederick John Matthews, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion in leading his company forward with ammunition under a heavy machine gun fire. He also attacked and captured a machine gun position, seizing the gun and taking about forty prisoners. 

 

Temp. 2nd Lt. George Arthur Newling, R.M. For conspicuous, gallantry in an attack, when he led his platoon with great courage and skill, and held the objective, when captured, against numerous counter-attacks.

 

Temp. Surg. James Ness McBean Ross, R.N. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion on many occasions in organising and leading stretcher-bearers in search for wounded and attending them under very heavy fire.

 

Temp. Sub-Lt. Francis Beacroft Smith, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry during an attack, when leading his men. Although shot three times, he continued, with great; dash and determination, to advance, bayonetting three of the enemy, refusing to retire until ordered to do so.  

 


 

 

30308 - 25 SEPTEMBER 1917

 

..... confer the undermentioned rewards for gallantry and distinguished service in the field.

 

Awarded the Military Cross.

T./Sub-Lt. Arthur Bruce Geden, R.N.V.R.

T./Lt. Sydney Herbert Wood, R.M. Arty.

 

 


 

 

30340 - 16 OCTOBER 1917

 

Awarded the Military Cross.

T./Sub.-Lt. John George Russell, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He commanded and led a successful raid on the enemy's trenches and secured an important identification. The success of  this enterprise was largely due to the good leading, cool courage and determination of this officer.  (Statement of Service published 5 March 1918, Gazette No. 30561)

 


 

 

30431 - 14 DECEMBER 1917

  

..... confer the undermentioned rewards for gallantry and distinguished service in the Field.

 

Awarded the Military Cross. (Listed in more detail in 30645)

T./Sub-Lt. Noel de Brissac Browning, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub-Lt. Kenneth Malcolm Evans, R.N.V.R.

T./Surg. Richard Glyn Morgan, R.M. Bn.

T./Sub-Lt. William Stevenson, R.N.V.R.

 


 

 

30450 - 28 DECEMBER 1917

 

.....  rewards for distinguished service in the Field. Dated 1st Jan. 1918:

 

Awarded the Military Cross.

Lt. Leonard William Barber, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub-Lt. John Hulme Bessell, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub-Lt. Leonard Anderson Blackhall, R.N.V.R

Lt (T./Capt.) Thomas Henry Burton, R.M.L.I.

T /Lt John Coote, R.N.V.R.

Sub.-Lt. (A./Lt.) Richard Donaldson, R.N.V.R.

Sub.-Lt. (A./Lt.) Charles James Eddolls, R.N.V.R.

Lt. (A./Lt.-Cdr.) Sidney Howard Fish, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub. Lt Lionel George Mitchelmore, R.N.V R.

T /Qr.-Mr and Hon. Lt. John Grant Murray, R.M., attd. Fd Amb 

 

 

 

1918

 

all War Office, and included in Army lists

 

 

30466 - 8 JANUARY 1918

 

With reference to the awards conferred as announced in the London Gazette, dated 26th Sept., 1917, the following are the statements of service for which the decorations were conferred

 

Awarded the Military Cross

T./Sub-Lt. Arthur Bruce Geden, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during a raid. He led his platoon with great gallantry, being the first to enter the hostile trench, where he shot two of the enemy who resisted. Although wounded he remained until he was satisfied that the flank was secure.

 

T./Lt. Sydney Herbert Wood, R.M. Arty. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in charge of a forward observation post. He established communication where others had failed, and pushed forward to a very advanced position, where he was severely wounded in two places. In spite of this, he remained at his post and continued to superintend the mending of broken wires under heavy shell fire throughout the night. He then brought his party together to the gun position, having set a splendid example of endurance and gallantry.

 


 

 

30482 - 15 JANUARY 1918

  

..... confer the undermentioned rewards for gallantry and distinguished service in the Field. The acts of gallantry for which the decorations have been awarded will be announced in the London Gazette as early as practicable:

 

Awarded a Second Bar to the Military Cross.

Sub-Lt. (A./Lt.) Walter Kilroy Harris, M.C, R.N.V.R. (M.C. gazetted 26th January, 1917.) (1st Bar gazetted. 18th July 1917.) (Listed in more detail in 30651)

Awarded a Bar to the Military Cross.

T./Surg. James Ness McBean Ross, M.C., M.D., R.N., attd. R.M. (M.C. gazetted 18th July, 1917.) (Listed in more detail in 30651)

Awarded the Military Cross. (Listed in more detail in 30651)

T./Lt. Warren Barclay, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub-Lt. John Cyril Bartholomew, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub-Lt. Joe Willie Brearley, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub-Lt. William Herbert Clarkson, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub-Lt. Edgar Archibald Elson, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub-Lt. Kenneth Ian Macdonald Fegan, R.N.V.R.

T./Lt. Geoffrey Ramsay Goldingham, R.M.L.I., attd. M.G.C.

T./Sub-Lt. Arthur Morson Perry, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub-Lt. Norman Roberts, R.N.V.R.

T./Capt. Henry Bernard van Praagh, R.M.L.I.

T./Sub-Lt. William Wellwood, R.N.V.R.

T./Lt. Thomas Westby, R.M.L.I., attd. M.G. Corps.

T./2nd Lt. William Corbett Williamson, R.M.L.I.

 


 

 

30555 - 1 MARCH 1918

 

..... confer the undermentioned rewards for gallantry and distinguished service in the Field. The acts of gallantry for which the decorations have been awarded will be announced in the London Gazette as early as practicable:

  

Awarded the Military Cross.

Sub-Lt. Arthur Gladstone Barker, R.N.V.R.

(Remaining names listed in more detail in 30845)

T./Sub-Lt. (A./Lt.) Herbert Benjamin Biggs, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub. Lt. Francis Leo Hall, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub. Lt. John Stewart Kessen, R.N.V.R

T./Lt. Aubrey Granville Maudsley, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub. Lt. John Bell Ramwell, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub-Lt. Tom Simmonds, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub-Lt. Frederick Charles Stacey, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub-Lt. John Miller Coutts Weir, M.M., R.N.V.R.

 


 

 

30614 - 5 APRIL 1918

 

With reference to the awards conferred as announced in the London Gazette dated 26th November, 1917, the following are the statements of service for which the decorations were conferred (including):

 

Awarded the Military Cross.

T./Sub-Lt. William Milton, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When one of our aeroplanes landed in flames and turned over, making it impossible for the pilot to escape, he at once went out with some men under enemy shell fire, had the aeroplane turned over, put out the fire, and saved the pilot's life.

 


 

 

30643 - 19 APRIL 1918

 

..... in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field

 

Awarded the Military Cross.

T./.Sub-Lt. William Wilson, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When in command of a platoon, after repulsing an attack by flammenwerfer, he very gallantly led his platoon under a heavy fire to counter-attack another body of the enemy who were advancing. He charged this party with the bayonet and routed them. It was owing to his example of coolness and disregard of danger that the success of the counter-attack was very largely due.

 


 

 

30645 - 19 APRIL 1918

 

With reference to the awards conferred as announced in the London Gazette dated 17th December, 1917, the following are the statements of service for which the decorations were conferred:

 

Awarded the Military Cross. (First listed in 30431)

T./Sub-Lt. Noel de Brissac Browning, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led his company in the assault with great courage and ability, and when his objective was gained he personally superintended the consolidation of the position under heavy shell and machine-gun fire. Although his left flank was in the air, he maintained his position until relieved.

 

T./Sub-Lt. Kenneth Malcolm Evans, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an advance he had two fingers shot off, but gallantly persisted in leading his men to their objective. Although again wounded, through the jaw, he continued to lead his men, and it was not until the objective was reached that he consented to return to the dressing station.

 

T./Surgeon Richard Glyn Morgan, R.N. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When wounded he carried on his duties under very heavy shell and rifle fire. Even when wounded a second time he worked with the stretcher-bearers in the open for thirty-six hours, until all the ground had been cleared of wounded. It was largely owing to his wonderful example and great exertions that the ground was cleared so quickly.

 

T./Sub.-Lt. William Stevenson, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in leading his platoon against a farm strongly held by the enemy. In spite of a stubborn resistance, and heavy losses, he finally succeeded in capturing the farm, with seven men - all that remained of his platoon. Although nearly surrounded by the enemy, he held the position until relieved that night.

 


 

 

30651 - 23 APRIL 1918

 

With reference to the awards conferred, as announced in the London Gazette dated 18th January, 1918, the following are the statements of service for which the decorations were conferred:

 

Awarded a Second Bar to the Military Cross.

Sub-Lt. (A./Lt.) Walter Kilroy Harris, M.C, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. His daring reconnaissances and thorough preparations contributed largely to the success of night operations, resulting in the capture of two enemy posts and three machine guns. By his skill and initiative he was the means of establishing the line in a commanding position. (First listed in 30482)

Awarded a Bar to the Military Cross.

T./Surg. James Ness McBean Ross, M.C., M.D., R.N., attd. R.M. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in attending wounded in the front line under heavy fire, until himself severely wounded. (First listed in 30482)

Awarded the Military Cross. (First listed in 30482)

T./Lt. Warren Barclay, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as battalion intelligence officer. He marked out the assembly position for a counter-attack. He then went forward to reconnoitre. One of his scouts having been wounded, he sent the other to help him, and though himself badly wounded, pushed forward and assisted in organising an attack.

 

T./Sub-Lt. John Cyril Bartholomew, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He boldly led his company forward, drove back the enemy advanced posts with losses, gaining about 500 yards and recapturing an important position.

 

T./Sub-Lt. Joe Willis Brearley, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. With eleven men he attacked a concrete dug-out in the dark. They killed three of the enemy and captured one officer and eleven other ranks, and a machine gun. The advance was over boggy ground, and the position was strongly wired. The enemy fired on them with a machine gun, but he himself shot the No. 1 of the gun and rushed the position.

 

T./Sub-Lt. William Herbert Clarkson, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in leading his men under heavy machine-gun fire to the capture of a dangerous concrete strong point. It was due to his initiative that the operation was successful and the position put into a state of defence.

 

T./Sub-Lt. Edgar Archibald Elson, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in charge of signalling arrangements during two offensives. He established communication in an area where it had previously been reported to be impossible, and managed to maintain communication from company to battalion and battalion to brigade headquarters. In spite of heavy shelling, he frequently visited his forward stations to ensure satisfactory working.

 

T./Sub-Lt. Kenneth Ian Macdonald Fegan, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When his right flank was attacked, he drove the enemy off and advanced his posts. With a few men he captured a machine gun, killing one man. He was suffering from the effects of gas poisoning at the time.

 

T./Lt. Geoffrey Ramsay Goldingham, R.M.L.I., attd. M.G.C. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in command of a group of machine-gun batteries. He personally reconnoitred and selected the position for each gun. When one battery suffered heavy casualties he took charge, made a reconnaissance under heavy fire and brought it into action in a new position. He maintained a complicated machine-gun barrage with great effect.

 

T./Sub-Lt. Arthur Morson Perry, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led his platoon in an attack on a hostile post, surprised the enemy and captured the garrison. The success was largely due to his sound preliminary arrangements and skilful leading.

 

T./Sub-Lt. Norman Roberts, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in command of his company after his company commander and more than one-fourth of the company had become casualties. On many occcasions he helped to bring in wounded at great personal risk. After relieving the garrison of our forward posts, he infused much offensive spirit into its defence and drove off the enemy, who had been harassing the defenders.

 

T./Capt. Henry Bernard van Praagh, R.M.L.I. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an enemy counter-attack he led forward a small part through an intense barrage to garrison a position under fire from snipers. He also carried out a reconnaissance under fire.

 

T./Sub-Lt. William Wellwood, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in command of his company during minor operations after his company commander had been wounded. He advanced his line 200 yards, but in doing so the two half-companies became separated. He reconnoitred the ground, under heavy machine-gun fire, and had to wade through a swamp, but eventually succeeded in finding the missing half-company.

 

T./Lt. Thomas Westby, R.M.L.I., attd. M.G. Corps. For conspicuous gallantry, and devotion to duty when in charge of four mobile machine guns. He twice made reconnaissances under heavy fire and disposed his guns with such skill that he achieved his task with negligible casualties.

 

T./2nd Lt. William Corbett Williamson, R.M.L.I. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Though wounded he led his platoon in an attack, captured a strong point, and organised the post under heavy fire until wounded a second time.

 


 

 

30681 - 10 MAY 1918

 

..... in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field:

 

Awarded the Military Cross.

T./2nd Lt. Edward Wilme Collier, R. Marines. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During a raid on an enemy trench he led his men with great dash to the objective. On seeing the enemy charging the left flank party, he altered his plans and succeeded in cutting off the hostile post from the rear. He personally accounted for six of the enemy, and, with a N.C.O., secured a prisoner. Thanks to his coolness and resource, the whole of the hostile garrison was put out of action.          

 


 

 

30716 - 31 MAY 1918

 

..... in connection with Military Operations in France and Flanders. Dated 3rd June, 1918:

  

Awarded the Military Cross.

T./Lt. William Russell, D.C.M., R.M.A.         

T./Lt. Thomas Alfred Ryder, R.M.A.

T./Sub-Lt. (A./Lt.) Frederick Witton Stear, R.N.V.R.

T./Sub Lt. (A./Lt.) Cyril Gordon Walker, R.N.V.R.

 


 

 

30813 - 23 JULY 1918

 

.....  in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field:

  

Awarded a Bar to the Military Cross.

T./Sub-Lt. Basil Bedsmore Rackham, M.C., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Although suffering from the effects of gas he remained at duty, and materially assisted in keeping the battalion together. It was only when the enemy's advance had been held up, and he was directly ordered to do so, that he went to hospital. (M.C. gazetted 26th March, 1917.) 

Awarded the Military Cross

T./Sub-Lt. (A./Lt.) Horace John Arnold,  R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when acting as rearguard during a withdrawal. His skilful manoeuvring of his company under heavy machine-gun fire covered both his own battalion and other units of the Division. He displayed great courage and initiative while carrying this out, and throughout the operations did much to maintain the morale of the troops. 

 

T./Capt. Francis Geoffrey Eliot, R. Marines. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in handling his transport with great ability and go, controlling the supply of ammunition, rations, water, and stores, often under fire, yet always delivering the supplies to troops in the immediate presence of the enemy, and extricating his vehicles in the midst of confusion and congestion with the utmost skill and courage. It was in great measure due to his efforts that the withdrawal was carried out so successfully. 

 

T./Sub-Lt. (A./Lt.) Max Medforth Hirschfeld, R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When all communications had broken down, he organised a series of patrols and messengers, by means of which touch was regained with the units of the brigade at a very critical time. In addition to making excellent arrangements, he showed the greatest skill and courage in leading one of these patrols through heavy shell fire to the unit it was most necessary to warn. 

 

T./Sub-Lt. Horace Alfred Marlow, R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in command of a company. He maintained posts in a village throughout the night and so prevented the enemy from establishing himself therein. Later, he also displayed great qualities of leadership and contributed in no small degree to the safe withdrawal of his company under heavy machinegun fire. 

 

T./Lt. John William Middleton, R. Marines. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He performed the duties of transport officer with great ability, never failing to bring the transport up and thus ensuring regular supplies. On more than one occasion, although in close contact with the enemy and at great risk, he came through with rations and also with ammunition. 

 

T./Sub-Lieut. Arthur Alfred Oldham, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the enemy attempted to establish a post close to our line, he jumped out of the trench and with one man drove the enemy away, taking one prisoner and dispersing the remainder. This action undoubtedly facilitated our withdrawal the same night. 

 

T./S.-Lt. (A./Lt.) Keith Everard Pearson, R.N.D., R.N.V.R., attd. M.G.C. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while attached, with four guns, to an infantry company under orders to counter-attack. He succeeded in taking his guns forward under intense shell fire to the best position obtainable, and after all the officers of the company had become casualties he took command, and led the company to their objective. His fearlessness and initiative were the admiration of all. 

 

T./Sub-Lt. Frederick John Philp, R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. At night time, when an enemy patrol had got into a village, he displayed great courage and initiative in getting together his headquarters' signallers, runners and batmen, and dispersing the patrol. Afterwards he collected all available headquarters' details and formed control posts at the entrance and exits of the village, thus denying the village to the enemy until a defensive flank had been made. Throughout the whole operations his dogged tenacity and cheerfulness greatly assisted to maintain the moral of those around him. 

 

T./Lt. Frederick Angelo Proffitt, R. Marines. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. After the enemy had broken through on the flanks and had captured the front line, he continued with his company to offer a stubborn resistance, and, although quite isolated, held the position until he finally withdrew in good order, closely pressed by the enemy. Later, he rendered the most valuable assistance and was largely responsible for the success of a counter-attack.  

 

T./Lt. Harold Algernon Sawyer, R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When communications had been cut and the situation was very obscure, he volunteered to go forward, and in spite of heavy machine-gun fire succeeded in reaching the battalion, to whom he gave instructions. Later in the night, he again showed splendid grit and determination in his daring efforts to reach the front line. 

 

T./Lt. Percy Albert Shepherd, R.N.D. R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack on enemy machine-gun positions. In spite of the difficult nature of the attack, which took place through a dense wood, he showed great skill and initiative in the handling of his company, so that the enemy were outflanked and forced to retire, leaving a machine gun behind them. 

 

Sub.-Lt. Percy Jack Smith, R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as battalion signalling officer. During a rearguard action he maintained communication with the withdrawing troops under heavy shell and machine-gun fire; and by keeping Battalion Headquarters informed as to the situation of the enemy's advance he ably assisted in extricating the battalion from a very precarious position.

 

T. /Capt. Rawden Henry Pitt West, R. Marines. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while performing the duties of Adjutant to the battalion. Although suffering acutely from gas poisoning, he performed his duties with great ability, and it was largely due to him that the battalion was enabled to withdraw in good order when instructed to do so.  

 


 

 

30817 - 26 JULY 1918

 

..... in connection with Military Operations in East Africa. Dated 3rd June, 1918:

 

Awarded the Military Cross.

T./Lt. James Campbell Morrison Guy, R. Mar. Arty. (temp. attd. Stokes Gun Bty.).  

 


 

 

30845 - 13 AUGUST 1918

 

With reference to the awards conferred as announced in the London Gazette dated 4th Match, 1918, the following are the statements of service for which the decorations were conferred: 

  

Awarded the Military Cross. (First listed in 30555)

T./Sub. Lt. Francis Leo Hall, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led a bombing party which cooperated with the counter-attack. He pushed forward with great determination, and was instrumental in driving out the crew of a machine gun, thus greatly assisting in the capture of the trench system.  

 

T./Sub-Lt. John Stewart Kessen, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When in command of a platoon during an attack by the enemy, he repelled the first attack, and when eventually driven back by superior numbers, proceeded to establish blocks in the communication trench, led bombing. parties and maintained his ground until the arrival of supports. It was largely owing to his courage and resource that the enemy were prevented from breaking through. 

 

T./Lt. Aubrey Granville Maudsley, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led forward reinforcements and assisted in bombing out parties of the enemy who had penetrated the front line. He took charge of a company in the front line, whose commander was wounded, and held his position against five attacks, inflicting heavy losses on the enemy. The company was subjected to an intense bombardment, and it was largely owing to his determined and courageous example that the line was held intact. 

 

T./Sub-Lt. John Bell Ramwell, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when the enemy attacked his position after an intense bombardment. By his leadership and good judgment he kept his men well under control and drove back the enemy with heavy losses. Though his flank was exposed he maintained his position intact, encouraging his men throughout by his coolness and courage under very heavy fire. 

 

T./Sub-Lt. Tom Simmonds, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led repeated bombing attacks, and, though heavily outnumbered, forced the enemy back and established a bombing block. He held the block with the greatest determination under intense fire for six hours, remaining at his post, though he was wounded. His fearless and courageous leadership was of the greatest value in a most difficult situation. 

 

T./Sub Lt. Frederick Charles Stacey, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During a counter-attack on an enemy position he led his platoon with marked courage and determination. On reaching the enemy position he bombed along the trench, driving the enemy before him, and established touch with the battalion on the left. By his fine example and determination the left flank of the attack was secured and the position consolidated. 

 

T./Sub Lt. John Miller Coutts Weir, M.M., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the enemy attacked after an intense bombardment and penetrated part of his line, he kept his men well in hand and fought every inch of ground. He led a counter-attack, drove the enemy back to their own lines, and reorganised the position. He held his ground against several further attacks under heavy fire, and inspired his men throughout by his determined and courageous leadership.

 


 

 

30950 - 11 OCTOBER 1918

 

Awarded the Military Cross. 

T./Sub-Lt. Andrew Blight Bolt, R.N.V.R. For remarkable gallantry during a raid. Finding no enemy in the first objective, he rushed forward to within a few yards of the barrage and reached the second objective. Most of the party had been held up by wire, but with seven men he jumped into the trench and bombed the dug-outs. As a result of this plucky action twenty-one prisoners were taken. He also assisted in capturing a heavy machine gun, after killing the crew. 

 

T./Sub-Lt. Harold Barton Briddon, R.N.V.R. For remarkable daring in a raid. He led his party through a difficult belt of wire and, approaching from the flank, dashed into the enemy position. They were standing to, and showed fight, but he attacked them singlehandedly, and after killing several succeeded in capturing a light machine gun, which was about to be turned on to the raiding party. Continuing along the trench, he killed two more of the enemy, and after a struggle captured a third, thus securing an important identification. 

 

T./Sub-Lt. John Dennis Green, R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He was in charge of the Stokes' mortars which put down a barrage in support of a raid. Despite heavy enemy shelling, which caused a direct hit on one of the guns, he showed fine courage and determination in keeping the remaining guns in action. At great personal risk, also, he dug out, with two volunteers, the body of the non-commissioned officer in charge of the gun which had been knocked out.

 


 

 

30997 - 5 NOVEMBER 1918

 

..... in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field:

 

Awarded the Military Cross.

T./Lt. William Daniel Hart, R. Marines. For conspicuous gallantry in action. As section officer on duty at the guns he showed the greatest coolness and ability during heavy shelling from an enemy battery, and though wounded, saw to the extinguishing of a fire which had been started and to the hiding from aircraft of the damage done before reporting himself to the field dressing station. He has on all occasions set the best possible example to his men.

 

 

 

1919

 

all War Office, and included in Army lists

 

 

31119 - 10 JANUARY 1919

 

Awarded a Bar To Military Cross.

T./Sub-Lt. (A./Lt.) Horace John Arnold, M.C., Drake Bn., R.N.V.R. He led his company in an attack with great gallantry, and inspired his men by his own example of dash and initiative. On one occasion he attacked single-handed a machine gun which was holding up our advance, and, having taken it, was able to capture six more machine guns and many prisoners. Throughout prolonged operations his fine leadership and perseverance were conspicuous. (M.C. gazetted 26th July, 1918.)

 

T./Sub-Lt. (A./Lt.) Reginald Francis Edsall Blackmore, M.C., Hawke Bn., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer carried out the duties of adjutant through a week's heavy fighting. On the C.O. becoming a casualty he took command of the battalion, and, by his unceasing vigilance, inspired all with confidence. When the battalion had become very weak through casualties he reorganised it and carried on. He personally made several reconnaissances under heavy machine-gun fire, and set a high standard to all. (M.C. gazetted 26th March, 1917.)

 

T./Sub.-Lt. (A./Lt.) William Reginald Gibson, M.C., Hood Bn., R.N.V.R.  For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer, in command of a company, led his men forward under an intense barrage of machine-gun fire, keeping them under complete control. When held up by a machine-gun, he personally went forward with two Lewis guns, and bringing the enemy under their fire, inflicted heavy casualties and caused them to surrender. He then led his company through a village, driving the enemy from their trenches, and, forming a bombing block in a trench, held it against a counter-attack, which occurred immediately. He showed great courage throughout. (M.C. gazetted 4th June, 1917.)

 

T./Surgeon Frank Pearce Pocock, D.S.O., M.C., R.N., attd. Drake Bn., R.N.V.R. He attended to the wounded under very heavy fire and most adverse circumstances during operations lasting several days. His courage and self-sacrificing devotion to duty were a splendid example to his stretcher-bearers, and his skill was instrumental in saving the lines of many wounded men. (M.C. gazetted 10th January, 1917.)

 

T./Lt. William Anderson Robertson, M.C., Drake Bn., R.N.V.R. During heavy fighting, lasting several days, this officer's fine example of gallantry and cheerfulness was conspicuous, and his behaviour greatly helped to overcome all obstacles and maintain the spirit of his men. On several occasions he dashed ahead of his company to attack machine-gun posts, and his men followed his fine leadership with determination and success. (M.C. gazetted 16th September, 1918.)

 

Sub-Lt. Walter Telfer, M.C., Hawke Bn., R.N.V.R., attd. 189th T.M. By. During two days' hard fighting this officer's fine example of gallantry and cheerfulness did much to maintain the spirit of his men. He displayed much tactical ability in the way he supported the infantry with the fire of his guns, and also in the manner he concentrated fire on the advancing waves of the enemy in their counter-attack. His courage and his energy were conspicuous.  (M.C. gazetted 16th September, 1918.)

Awarded the Military Cross.

T./Sub. Lt. Walter Barnett, Anson Bn., R.N.V.R., R.N. Div. For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. Under heavy machine-gun fire he successfully led his company forward by rushes to the final objective. Twenty-seven enemy machine guns were afterwards counted on the ground over which his company passed, and it was chiefly owing to their determined advance that the battalion was able to reach its final objective. He showed fine courage and leadership.

 

T./Sub Lt. Edward Charlton Barrass, Hood Bn., R.N.V.R., R.N.D. When the platoon of which he was in command was held up by the severe machine-gun fire of the enemy, he went forward to reconnoitre personally, and, having located the position of the machine gun, he brought forward his Lewis gun and put the enemy gun out of action. He behaved with great gallantry and composure under heavy fire, and his action enabled the advance to proceed.

 

T./Surg. David Leishman Baxter, R.N., attd. Ist Bn., R. Marines.  For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He early established an aid post well forward, and continued to move forward with the advance, showing utter disregard of personal danger when searching for wounded and having them dressed under heavy fire. He caused all wounded to be rapidly evacuated, and throughout set a very fine example to his staff.

 

T./Sub-Lt. Robert Harold Brewer, M.M., Hood Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. He displayed conspicuous gallantry and initiative when part of the line was held up. He crept forward and bombed and captured a machine-gun post that was impeding our advance, which was then able to proceed.

 

T./Sub.-Lt. Harry Carr, Hood Bn., R.N.V.R., R.N.D. He displayed conspicuous gallantry in an attack, rushing and destroying a machine-gun post which was causing heavy casualties to his men. When the enemy counterattacked he handled two companies with great skill and completely repulsed them. He set a fine example to all ranks.

 

T./Lt. Joseph Andrew Patrick Curran, 1st Bn., R. Marines.  He led his platoon with great courage and dash in an attack, capturing a machine gun and dealing with its crew. When the final objective was reached his company commander was killed and he took command of the company and consolidated the captured position with considerable skill.

 

T./Sub.-Lt. George Rose Ferguson, Drake Bn., R.N. Div., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He successfully led his platoon through heavy shell and machine-gun fire to the- objective, and then rapidly reorganised his men and got them forward to exploit the success of the attack. Later, he led rushes against machine-gun posts, and during the reorganisation and consolidation showed great energy and skill in the disposition of his men. Throughout he set a fine example of courage and leadership.

 

T./Lt. Sydney Flowitt, Hawke Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He handled his company splendidly under very heavy enemy machine-gun barrage, and rushed three enemy posts, killing the crews. Later, he was invaluable in his reconnaissance and reports on the situation. His courage, cheerfulness and devotion to duty inspired all under his command.

 

T./Sub-Lt. Thomas Barrow Green, Hood Bn; R.N.D., R.N.V.R. He led his platoon forward under heavy machine-gun fire with great gallantry, and by skilful manoeuvring he put out of action an enemy machine gun that was causing casualties to our men. His example and personal conduct inspired his men with the utmost determination. When the enemy counter-attacked they were repulsed with severe loss.

 

T./Lt. Herbert Law Hardisty, 1st Bn., R. Marines. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When ordered to carry out an immediate counter-attack in conjunction with another battalion, he led his company forward in a most fearless manner under heavy machine-gun fire and established the original line, afterwards maintaining his position until relieved. Throughout the operations he showed great initiative and resource.

 

T./Sub-Lt. John William Kerr, Hood Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. When the commanding officer was killed, at the beginning of the action, this officer rendered valuable service in rallying the men and leading them forward again, and when the battalion reached the outskirts of the village that was being attacked, he again reorganised the men under heavy shell fire. His gallantry and ability were conspicuous.

 

T. /Sub-Lt. Frank Herbert Kirkhouse, Hood Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. When held up by machine-gun fire he led his platoon round by the flank and' captured at least one machine gun and crew, thereby enabling his company to advance and enter a village. He showed the greatest coolness under fire and set a fine example to his men.

 

T./Sub-Lt. Henry Douglas Lane, Drake Bn., R.N. Div., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He was in command of the left flank of the advance, and handled his men most skilfully, working round several strong points and attacking them from the flanks, thus making it possible for the remainder of the line to advance. Though wounded, he continued to lead his men to and beyond the objective. He set a fine example of courage and determination throughout.

 

T./Lt. (T./Lt.-Comdr.) Malcolm Maclaren, R.N.V.R. (N. RUSSIA)  For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Prior to the Allied occupation of Archangel, he was instrumental in organising and preparing throughout northern Russia the necessary groups and agents, without which reliable information would have been extremely difficult to obtain. He lived as a Russian subject and was in danger of arrest as a spy; he rendered extremely valuable information to the senior British military representative at Archangel. He took measures to destroy the defensive plans of the opposing forces, and facilitated the entrance of the Allies. During the revolution, which coincided with the occupation of Archangel, he, by his conduct and control of Russian troops, was most instrumental in preventing opposition to the occupation of the town. During this period he was in the greatest danger.

 

T./Sub-Lt. Thomas Irvine Morton, Hood Bn., R.N. Div., R.N.V.R., attd. H.Q., 189th Inf. Bde. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He carried out a daring reconnaissance, discovered the withdrawal of the enemy from a considerable area in front, and so cleared up the situation that plans for further operations could be made. Later, under heavy shelling, he took instructions to battalion commanders and sent back accurate information to brigade headquarters. He rendered very valuable service.

 

T./Sub-Lt. John William Wale Mowatt, Drake Bn., R N. Div., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership in an attack. Though wounded and his platoon somewhat disorganised, he rallied them and pushed on to his objective and passed far beyond it. Later, he led his platoon forward under very heavy fire, and when the advance was held up his cheery manner maintained the morale of his men. Throughout the operations he set a very fine example of pluck and determination.

 

T./Sub-Lt. George Henry Munday, Hood Bn., R.N. Div., R.N.V.R.  For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. Being ordered to take his platoon forward to a ridge in front of the right flank to render the advance of the battalion possible by his enfilade fire, he led his men on under heavy machine-gun fire to the required position and got in touch with the battalion on the right. He attacked single-handed a party of the enemy, shooting several and capturing the rest. He showed splendid courage, and his successful leadership greatly helped the advance.

 

T./Sub-Lt. Charles Martin Robertson, Anson Bn., R.N. Div., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He led his men splendidly, and when units on his flank were compelled to retire he established a flank defence which he led until he was severely wounded. By his prompt action and courage a critical situation was averted.

 

T./Lt. Richard William Spraggett, 1st Bn. R. Marines. He took up the duties of battalion adjutant only a few minutes before the attack started and performed them with great ability. With some details of other units began to withdraw during an enemy counter-attack he rallied and reorganised them, and led them back to their positions. His gallantry and coolness under heavy fire were a fine example, and had a great effect in steadying the men.

 

Lt. Thomas Graeme Stewart, D.C.M., 1st Bn., R. Marines. For conspicuous gallantry during an attack. He led his platoon with great dash against strong enemy machine-gun positions which were checking the advance. Later, when new positions were strongly attacked by the enemy, he held on to his posts and prevented them from reaching a single point in the line. He also assumed command of another company which had lost its officers and handled them with skill. Throughout he showed fine leadership and devotion to duty.  

 

T./2nd Lt. Alexander George Stone, 1st Bn., R. Marines. He led his platoon with great dash and captured the objective. When the enemy counter-attacked and forced back units on his flank he led his platoon forward and dispersed the enemy with heavy losses, manning a Lewis gun himself as all its team had become casualties. His gallant example completely restored a critical situation.

 

Rev. William Edwin Trelawny Trelawny-Ross, A.C.D., attd. Drake Bn., R.N.V.R. He went forward with the first wave, and superintended the removal of wounded men to places of safety, carrying some of them himself, under .heavy fire. His gallant example, unarmed, amid heavy fighting, had a very great effect on all who were with him.

 

T./Sub-Lt. Charles Edwin Upson, D.D., Drake Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When on reconnaissance work he located an enemy machine gun, which he attacked, capturing the gun and one prisoner. His reconnaissance work also was of great value. During an attack he successfully kept direction of the left flank. His energy and pluck throughout the operations were most marked.

 

T./Sub-Lt. Guy Charlton Vokins, Hawke Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. He was severely wounded in an attack but rallied his men and captured a machine gun and pushed on till he fell exhausted with loss of blood. Nevertheless, he still tried to crawl forward, but was unable to move. His courage and tenacity inspired his platoon with the greatest dash and determination.

 

T./Sub-Lt. Sydney William George Walker, M.M., Drake Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as battalion intelligence officer during an attack. It was largely his excellent guidance and skilful reading of the compass that enabled the leading platoons to maintain direction in the thick fog. He afterwards rendered very valuable assistance in keeping touch with flanking units, and later rallied a party of men whom the enemy had driven out of a forward position and recaptured the position and re-established the line. He rendered most valuable service.

 

T./Sub. Lt. John Williams, Hawke Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R.  He led his men in face of heavy machine-gun fire with great courage and dash, capturing two guns which were impeding our advance. His example and leadership carried his men forward with irresistible impetus.

 


 

 

31219 - 7 MARCH 1919

 

..... in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field. The acts of gallantly for which the decorations have been awarded will be announced in the London Gazette as early as practicable.

 

Awarded a First Bar to the Military Cross.

T./Sub-Lt. George Clark, M.C., Hawke Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. (M.C. gazetted 15th February, 1919.) 

 


 

 

31266 - 1 APRIL 1919

 

..... in recognition of their gallantry and devotion to duty in the Field. The acts of gallantry for which the decorations have been awarded will be announced in the London Gazette as early as possible:

 

Awarded a Second Bar to the Military Cross. (Listed in more detail in 31680)

T./Lt. Reginald Francis Edsall Blackmore, M.C., Hawke Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. (M.C. gazetted 26th March, 1917.) (1st Bar gazetted 11th January, 1919.) 

Awarded a Bar to the Military Cross. (Listed in more detail in 31680)

T./Sub-Lt. George Rose Ferguson, M.C., Drake Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. (M.C. gazetted 11th January, 1919.) 

T./Surg. Charles Edward Leake, M.C., R.N., attd. Hawke Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. (M.C. gazetted 11th January, 1919.) 

T./Sub-Lt. John Algernon Pennell, M.C., Drake Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. (M.C. gazetted 16th September, 1918.)

Sub-Lt. Sydney William George Walker, M.C., M.M., Drake Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. (M.C. gazetted 11th January, 1919.) 

 Awarded the Military Cross. (Listed in more detail in 31680)

T./Sub-Lt. James Milne Law, Anson Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R.

T/Sub. Lt. James Wright Orr, Hawke Bn., R.N.D., R N.V.R. 

T./Sub-Lt. Frank Victor Wood, Hawke Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. 

 


 

 

31370 - 30 MAY 1919

  

..... in connection with Military Operations in France and Flanders.

  

Awarded the Military Cross

T. /Capt. Cecil Caradoc Carus-Wilson, No. 10 Howr., R.M.A.

T./Surg. Lt. Reginald Kenworthy Shaw, R.N., attd. Anson Bn., R.N. Div., R.N.V.R.

T./Lt. Harrison Churchill Smith, R.M.L.I., attd. H.Q., 63rd Div 

 


 

 

31583 - 3 OCTOBER 1919

 

With reference to the Awards conferred as announced in the London Gazette, dated 8th March, 1919, the following are the statements of services for which the decorations were conferred:

  

Awarded a First Bar to the Military Cross

T./Sub-Lt. George Clark, M.C., Hawke Bn.,R.N.D., R.N.V.R. In the operations at Niergnies, on 8th October, 1918, he showed conspicuous gallantry and initiative after his company commander had been killed. By his skilful use of the weapons at his disposal he silenced an enemy post which was harassing the consolidation, and later, by a daring personal reconnaissance under heavy fire, he obtained the dispositions of the troops on his left and forwarded valuable information to his battalion headquarters. Throughout he set a fine example to his men. (M.C. gazetted 15th February, 1919.)

 


 

 

31680 - 9 DECEMBER 1919

 

With reference to the awards conferred as announced in the London Gazette dated 2nd April, 1919, the following are the statements of services for which the decorations were conferred:

 

Awarded a Second Bar to the Military Cross

T./Lt. Reginald Francis Edsall Blackmore M.C., Hawke Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership during the operations near Cambrai, 27th September to 1st October, 1918. On the commanding officer being severely wounded he took over command and gallantly led them forward to the attack on Graincourt, which resulted in the capture of field guns and a large number of machine-guns. Later, he made a daring reconnaissance, which resulted in his being able to take two companies across the canal and River l'Escault, which materially assisted in eventually making good the passages. (M.C. gazetted 26th March, 1917.) (1st Bar gazetted 11th January, 1919.) (First listed in 31266)

Awarded a Bar to the Military Cross. (First listed in 31119)

T./Sub-Lt. George Rose Ferguson, M.C., Drake Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For marked gallantry and fine leadership from 1st September to 1st October, 1918, during the operations from Moeuvres to Proville. His company commander having early become a casualty, he took over the company and ably commanded them. He personally led a bombing party down the Hindenburg support line, and cleared up many machine-gun posts, capturing in all 150 prisoners. Later he carried out a reconnaissance under heavy fire, and, although wounded, he continued until he had gathered the information required. (M.C. gazetted 11th January, 1919.) 

 

T./Surg. Charles Edward Leake, M.C., R.N., attd. Hawke Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. During the operations of the 27th/29th September, 1918, he carried out his duties with untiring energy and total disregard for personal safety. On many occasions he displayed admirable coolness under heavy fire, and succeeded in establishing his regimental aid-post in the most advanced positions, where he attended the wounded of all battalions. His work throughout was of the highest order.

(M.C. gazetted 11th January, 1919.) 

 

T./Sub-Lt. John Algernon Pennell, M.C., Drake Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and initiative whilst employed as liaison officer between brigade and battalion at Graincourt and Escault Canal from 27th September to 1st October, 1918. He several times took orders over machine-gun and shell-swept areas. It was largely due to his resource and clearheadedness that the battalion was able to move to the attack at the l'Escault Canal within thirty-five minutes of the orders being issued from brigade. Throughout his liaison work was excellent.

(M.C. gazetted 16th September, 1918.)

 

Sub-Lt. Sydney William George Walker, M.C., M.M., Drake Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and dash at Graincourt. He was responsible for giving alignment for the forming up of two companies on the ridge east of Canal du Nord. During the process of alignment the two company commanders became casualties, thus causing confusion amongst the troops. He rallied the party and pushed them forward. 'Later, in Hindenburg Trench, he ably commanded a trench-clearing -party under enfilade fire. Whilst endeavouring to capture a small field gun later he was fired at point blank and became a casualty. His conduct throughout was splendid. (M.C. gazetted 11th January, 1919.) 

Awarded the Military Cross. (First listed in 31266)

T./Sub-Lt. James Milne Law, Anson Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the attack on 10th November, 1918, on the railway embankment near Harmignies. When the whole battalion was held up by heavy machine-gun fire, he, with a small party of men, worked round the right flank, swam and waded the river and flooded country, scaled the cliff, and forced the enemy out of his position. This enabled the left half of the battalion to advance, and was achieved under heavy machine-gun fire the whole time.

 

T/Sub. Lt. James Wright Orr, Hawke Bn., R.N.D., R N.V.R.  During September 27/29th, 1918, he showed great gallantry and skill in leading his platoon. When attacking Grancourt he attacked a machine-gun nest successfully, enabling his company to advance. Later, at the Canal de l'Escaut he crossed the canal and maintained his position under heavy fire, enabling other troops to pass through.

 

T./Sub-Lt. Frank Victor Wood, Hawke Bn., R.N.D., R.N.V.R.  During the operations of 27th/29th September, 1918, he, in his capacity of intelligence officer, personally carried out many dangerous reconnaissances, and obtained information of much value to the battalion. In the attack on Graincourt he moved forward with the attacking companies, and later, took up a position on high ground swept by machine-gun fire. The information he obtained on this occasion enabled reinforcements to be moved to a flank temporarily in difficulties. Throughout the operations he did excellent work.

 

 

 

1920

 

all War Office, and included in Army lists

 

 

31745 - 20 JANUARY 1920

 

..... awards for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in North Russia conferred by Maj.-Gen. C C. M. Maynard, K.C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O., in pursuance of the powers vested in him by His Majesty: 

 

Murmansk Command.

  

Awarded the Military Cross.

T./Sub-Lt. (A./Lt.) George William Armstrong, R.N.R. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at Vat Navalok, on the night 14th-15th September, 1919, when he was responsible for the capture of 48 enemy who were endeavouring to capture the village. Again on the 15th September he led a patrol under heavy fire to within close range of the enemy position, and forced the enemy to retire. He set throughout a fine example of courage and zeal.

 

Lt. William Alfred Mackenzie Hanson, R.M.L.I. For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership at Ussuna on the 8th September, 1919, when, although wounded, he refused to leave the line, thereby steadying his platoon.

 

Lt. Wilton Vivian Wood, R.N.R. For conspicuous gallantry and determination at Rimskaya, on 29th August, 1919. He led his section into action with great skill coolness and captured thirty prisoners.

 


 

 

32092 - 19 OCTOBER 1920

  

..... in recognition of gallant and distinguished services in the Field, which have been, brought to notice in accordance with the terms of Army Order 193 of 1919. To be dated 1st January, 1919: 

 

Awarded the Military Cross.

Sub-Lt. William Telfer, R.N.V.R. (France) For gallantry and determination at Niergenie on the 9th September, 1918, when he tenaciously maintained his position against an attack by German tanks.


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